17 comments on “Watch your toes!

  1. Yeah, that’s a real monster. But it’d really take off fingers and toes? I think the worst our crabs would do is give you a bit of a nip. If so it would put them in the same category as our otters who are cute, but can chew your fingers off without effort… as one of our wildlife TV presenters found out. Also in our news yesterday was a fox who took a 4 week old baby’s finger off. All fingers and toes at the moment.

    • I saw that fox report and if memory serves it is not the only attack on children in recent years. I know that the more animals get used to food coming from humans the braver they get when it comes to seeking it out (we have had a kangaroo opening our esky while we have been camping) but to go into a house and chomp a kid…..? That seems a little extreme!

      Maybe mum had better wash the child’s hands a little better in the future, perhaps they still tasted of the yummy dinner and it wasn’t a finger the fox was after at all… 😉

      I have no evidence that a yabbie of this size could remove a small finger but I had a look at an old Australian Geographic with an article about yabbies and it tells me that until about 30 years ago in Tasmania you could still find the worlds largest freshwater invertebrates, weighing up to 6kg and measuring 80cm. They had claws 30cm long that were strong enough to break a man’s arm. Ouch! The link below is to the very picture I am looking at in the magazine. Ouch again!

      http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/view-image.htm?index=9&gid=4129

      After seeing that, and having been painfully nipped by my own much smaller pet yabbies in the past, I have no problem believing that the one in my photos could damage a finger or toe beyond repair! 🙂

      • There have been a few fox-child cases but the media whip it up into something worse than it is. Still very rare. One of the case they cite it the child that went and grabbed a fox’s tail that was sleeping under a portacabin (I think) and in my view it had every right to be miffed and defend itself. I feed foxes on a nightly basis, have been doing so for years, and not found that this makes them any tamer or easy to spot. In all the years I have encountered ONE rogue fox once which in the middle of the night was attacking a hedgehog in my neighbour’s back garden. They cries of a hedgehog are horrific. I couldn’t shoo the fox away (most run at the sound or sight of you) and ended up in my neighbour’s back garden having to chase it away whilst I stripped down topless to wrap the bleeding hedgehog up and take it home. It sadly died a day later. Saying that the foxes in London do seem remarkably bold.

        • A kid yanking the tail of a sleeping anything deserves the bite they get!

          In Australia foxes are an introduced feral pest and are not popular at all. They have moved into built up areas here too but I have never heard of them being a danger to people, just critters that are smaller that they are.

          Poor hedgehog, foxes kill a lot of wildlife here and you often see signs on trees up in the bush letting you know that the area has been baited with 1080 to try to control their numbers.

    • People (like EllaDee below) love eating yabbies, and many people encourage them to live in their own dams for later consumption.
      Fortunately they don’t have a finger sized mouth, they have tiny, tiny mouths that eat in little bites, unfortunately that means the yabbie you are eating might be filled with mouthfuls of person and you would never know 😉

    • It is a ripper isn’t it! I would have loved to take him home and install him in a tank for my own viewing pleasure but our biggest tank would still not have been large enough to keep him happy!

      I have never seen one this big in the wild, although one time I was sitting by a creek past Warburton and in the murky water what looked like a bright blue Fosters beer can got up and started walking against the current. As much as I wanted to see this critter clearly there was no way I was sticking my hand close to something that big armed with pincers… Leave well enough alone I say!

      Ps: you might be interested in the link I put in my reply to Frivolous Monsters, a 30cm claw that can break a man’s arm! Don’t mess with those ones!!

  2. Wow… amazing. I haven’t seen a yabbie that big, and to think there are more, similar, in a special giant yabbie location. It’s lucky that the location not anywhere near my family as the yabbies would be quickly gobbled up… but even I would have to consider honouring the giant yabbie’s age and size and leaving it be 🙂

    • I think that it is quite lucky for these guys ongoing safety that you are in another state! 😉

      I did check if the kid was going to eat the yabbie or let it go. If he was going to take it home for dinner I was going to give him 10 bucks for it and take it back myself.

    • It is unusual (around here anyway) to see one so large. Yabbies can come in a variety of colours and the pet ones I had years ago were light blue. I have seen bright blue ones out in the bush and it is not unusual to find cracked blue claws on the ground, the remnants of someones earlier meal!

      They are a cheap and very entertaining pet, I bought four tiny ones to live in a tank with some big fish and they all peacefully co-existed, fish at the top, yabbies at the bottom. Occasionally a fish might stray too close and have a bit of fin removed but they learnt that lesson pretty quickly!

    • English is a wonderful language isn’t it 😀

      The word esky is a generic one here for any insulated cooler but, as with everything, the name is now owned by a company who guards it jealously. It will never change the fact that something which can contain ice and beer/bbq meat/lemonade for the kids is called an esky.

    • It would probably be a one act wonder though, yabbies are quite shy (unless you poke one or are bite sized) so the movie would only be the destruction wrought as it raced back to its nice safe rock! 🙂

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